Marketing manager job description

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Marketing is vital to how a  business is perceived and responds to customer needs to drive company profits. If you are already a busy marketing executive you might be ready to take the next step on the career ladder and find a role as a marketing manager.

What is a marketing manager?

A marketing manager is a varied role demanding creativity, customer insight and management skills. They look after day-to-day marketing activities including overseeing end-to-end campaigns, design issues as well as the  longer term marketing strategy. 

Being a marketing manager is no longer just about producing glossy brochures with things like social media, media PR and website management also part of the job.

Experience needed

There are no set entry requirements to become a marketing manager and these will vary from company to company. Generally speaking, you should have around three to five years’ experience in a junior role before applying for a senior position.

Many marketers have degrees in subjects such as marketing, business, economics and computing, as well as chartered status from the Chartered Institute of Marketing. Having one of these recognised qualifications will be a major feather in your cap.

Qualifications such as HND/HNC in Business Studies, The Chartered Institute of Marketing Certificate, the Advanced Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing and the Institute of Direct Marketing Diploma are all highly relevant and accepted.

In addition to specific qualifications, you will be expected to have strong communication, analytical and project management skills. You should also be confident, dynamic and have a strong creative outlook.

To move into a management role, you will also need to possess strong leadership and motivational skills as well as have experience of budgeting for marketing campaigns. You’ll need a flair for the job and to have a proven track record on previous marketing campaigns and projects you have been involved with.

What are the day-to-day roles of a marketing manager?

Your day-to-day tasks will be many and diverse, depending on what projects you are working on. You could be planning campaigns and managing budgets or meeting clients and attending trade shows. You will also have to research markets, analyse trends and identify suitable marketing campaigns for your company as well as devise new marketing strategies or develop social media presence.

You could find yourself managing a team of marketing executives and overseeing their work, holding meetings, reporting on projects and delegating tasks to junior members. You are also likely to work closely with the sales team so any activities are coordinated, increasing leads and ultimately company sales.  

In addition, you will be expected to analyse the results of any marketing campaigns, assess their effectiveness and report your findings to senior management.

Other daily activities could include:

  • Researching competitor products and services
  • Dealing with the production of promotional material
  • Liaising with other internal departments
  • Exploring ways to increase profitability by improving existing products and services.
  • Preparing presentations

Career progression and salaries

As an experienced marketer embarking on your first management position you can expect to earn between £30,000 and £45,000 a year on average. Highly experienced marketing managers will earn in excess of £50,000 though these figures vary enormously from company to company and depending on where in the UK you are based. The industry you are in can also have a positive effect on your salary. For example, a marketing manager for a large computer company or high-tech manufacturer could command £65,000 or more.

Once you have experience as a marketing manager you can look at more senior roles such as account director or brand director and eventually marketing director or even managing director. You could also become self-employed, working as a marketing consultant.

 

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